Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Sylvan Terrace

 

Sylvan Terrace Study
Oil on 6x6 inch panel
mounted on an 8x8 inch panel

Up in Washington Heights I stumbled upon Sylvan Terrace - a mews right out of the 1800's while exploring Harlem and Washington Heights with a friend on a sunny Saturday. Colorful green wooden shutters, hobbit sized street level doors, old street lamps, a cobblestone street. So unexpected to see this charming relic from an earlier time in New York City architecture.

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

MoMA P.S. 1 Afternoon Sunlight

 


MoMA P.S. 1 Afternoon Sunlight
Oil on panel
6x6 inches

Today is dreary, gray and rainy so I'm posting a bright painting - a small study of sunlight hitting the side of an old building in Long Island City, MoMA P.S. 1. This former school - the first public school in Queens, NY - became an art institution in the 1970's. The museum is currently a venue for MoMA's new and cutting edge exhibitions and the former classrooms have become artists studios for international artists. I pass by this building daily and in the late afternoon the sunlight hits the old red brick creating a glowing, warm and beautiful building facade. 

Friday, October 16, 2020

The Artist and Selfie Painting Competition 2020

 

Tobi Painting
Oil on panel
8x8 inches

Something a little different today. I decided to enter this competition and created a new painting of Tobi Kahn, one of the hardest working artists I know, painting in his NY studio. This competition is primarily geared to academic realism, not exactly how I paint, but decided to give it a whirl. Looking forward to seeing the entries submitted, especially the People's Choice section.
#artcall


Thursday, October 8, 2020

A Chelsea Rainbow

 

A Chelsea Rainbow
Oil on panel
6x6 inches mounted on an 8x8 inch panel

There were some mighty rainstorms this past summer resulting in beautiful rainbows across the city. Looked out my window as the sky was clearing after one and saw a beautiful sight. Grabbed my phone, took a photo, set up the small easel on the kitchen table and proceeded to paint this small study.




Thursday, October 1, 2020

Audobon Ballroom Terracotta

 

Audobon Ballroom Terracotta
Oil on panel
8x8 inches

One summer day pre-Covid, my friend Debbie and I went on an art stroll in Harlem and Washington Heights. All of a sudden I spotted this facade from across the street on Broadway and West 165th Street. Wow, what a fabulous facade. I hurried across to the island on the middle of Broadway and started taking photos of the building from all different angles. Just love coming upon these architectural details and this terracotta beauty is spectacular. Decided to do a painting and here is the result, another in my "kitchen table series of small works". A LOT of detail on a small scale panel. So happy the building was not torn down but restored and is still in use today.

The Audobon Ballroom was built in 1912 by Thomas W. Lamb as a theater. Here is some information about the building from Wikipedia.

Architect Thomas Lamb, who later would design the nearby eclectic United Palace, was an advocate of the use of ornamentation and color on his building's exteriors. He would write: ""Exotic ornaments, colors and scenes are particularly effective in creating an atmosphere in which the mind is free to frolic and becomes receptive to entertainment."[10] In line with this philosophy, the facade of the Audubon Ballroom presents terra-cotta glazed polychromy, encrustations and cornices.[11] Its ornamentations include brown foxes between the windows on the second floor, intended to flatter Fox,[3] and, most prominently, a colorful protruding three-dimensional statue of Neptune on a ship.[1]

Alterations to the building in 1996 were made by the architecture firm of Davis Brody Bond, who also designed Columbia University's new building, while the restoration of the facade was handled by preservation specialist Jan Hird Pokorny.[11] 

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Chrysler Reflections Revisited

 

Chrysler Reflections Revisited
Oil on panel
6x6 inches

The Chrysler Building is truly a one of a kind architectural gem and I never tire of finding new vantage points of viewing and painting this NYC treasure. This view is from 42nd Street, west of the building. There is nothing else like the crown that adorns this always recognizable and beloved building. One day this small study might become the basis for a larger painting.

Sunday, September 6, 2020

Two for the Oculus

 

"Two for the Oculus"
Oil on panel
6x6 inches
mounted on an 8x8 inch panel

The Occulus located in downtown Manhattan is a a very unusual building, unlike the architecture surrounding it. Reminds me of a bird about to take flight. The interior is light filled and is part of the memorial to 9/11. So much of lower Manhattan has been reimagined and rebuilt since the tragic events that took place 19 years ago this coming Friday, hard to believe and still a painful memory.

I saw these two people having a quiet conversation on the outside of the building on a sunny afternoon and thought this might be a good subject for a small painting.

Here is photo of the Occulus looking head on.